Dawn

Fire in the dawn,
Whence does it come?
Is it phoenix or dragon,
In this crucible of the future?
Should I fear the spawn,
That beats this drum,
Regardless it hope or jargon
How we worry about this crooner.

In its flight, shadows cast
Larger than it is fast
Yet light it brings
A calming voice now sings
Uncertain siren or savior
My heart judges its behavior
Trusting what it knows
Suspicious of this one’s glows

Answers it can’t give
Wisdom will not sieve
Either give a monster power
From its gaze then cower
Else carry the note of hope
And assist those that cope
A choice to be discerned
Indecisiveness to be inurned

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Chasm

Sun light cut through the haze that still rose from the ground.  The chasm had cut the city, running a jagged line from the Saj-graf Monolith to the Chalice Gate.  It swallowed not a soul the day it formed, but left many hurt in its creation.  Nothing came flowing out though the top of a spire fell in. Many a basement now had light.  The Locked Chancery had a new window to the world and lost a large amount of beer to sate the chasm’s thirst.

Hector walked with Corvus along the length of the chasm.  Hector had been asked to evaluate the best places for bridges to cross the gap by Mayor Alvin.  He hit the ground with his staff trying to judge the response.  The two were discussing what the lack of a monolith meant for the city and debated how long it would be till Ogres or a manticore showed up to threaten the city.  Their conversation paused as they watch a couple of teenagers run and jump a narrow point of the chasm.  Corvus shook his head at the foolishness while Hector laughed at the teens’ success.

“I still cannot think of anyone in town that would do such a thing.  Hewing the best protection we have and then no other follows through.”  Spoke Hector.

“It is probably the work of some group of mercenaries looking for work.” Corvus responded.

“Then they should go work for one of the trade houses, or volunteer for the wars in the south.  There is no reason the people of Saj-graf need this burden.”

“I agree, if the city is attacked I am expected to muster at least a hundred men, well ninety-nine if I choose to serve.  I think that would be every person I have working in the fields.

“Do you think it could be an agent of King Vincent?  He has always had his eye on Saj-graf as a port town with access to the Vertrive Sea.  That seems more likely, but why would he not coordinate with his corsairs’ attack on Port Gertrude. It would have made more sense.”

“Lord Corvus, have we taken to admiring the City’s new feature?” A voice spoke up from behind.  It was Gabriel, walking down the street in one of the few times during the day.  Walking alongside him were Martell and Kit.

“Yes, and talk with my brother Hector, he is charged with management of the city’s infrastructure you know.” replied Corvus pondering what Gabriel was after. “Have you taken on a personal guards?”

“Them?  No we are on our way to talk to Ardent Order.  They are interrogating a bandit named Sartow for his motives in the city.  He was roughing up some patrons at a tavern when the guard arrested him. Best of luck with your civil service.”  The trio continued on their way.

“War would alter the power structure in this city,” Hector mused. “Surely a few of the nobles will seek glory in battle in fail, freeing their lands to be distributed.  Corvus, are you the one they call the Prince?”

Corvus burst into laughter. “Hector, if only I had the brain for such planning.  No, I am far too petty for that job.”

Daybreak

As the light breaks in each morning
I drive away from you wondering
How do I love you effortlessly
More than anything else

I lay myself bare to your yearning
Vulnerable to any desire
You move to strike knowingly
Only an instant and I am yours

Carefully you are holding
Letting me know I can escape
Hanging on hopefully
I stay comforted us alone

Fenshorn Manor

Siwaldh looked out from the balcony of the Fenshorn Manor.  From there he could see the glistening Saj-graf Monolith protecting the city. The marble floors were a nice contrast to the inconsistent wood of the inn he spent his nights at. If Siwaldh had the luxury, he would spend every night in a place with so few drafts, and filled with the aroma of a garden below.  Grabbing an apple from nearby he savored the freshness and lack of bruises on the flesh.

Unfortunately, as an uninvited gust of the Fenshorns, Siwaldh would only have some much time to make preparations and fell the monolith.  He had chosen the manor because this enchantment required a line of sight to work.  With luck the Fenshorn family was residing in their country manor so he only had to deal with a few servants for access to the place.  No doubt the family would miss their loyal maids and butlers, but witnesses were not part of the contract from the Prince.  He needed only two days to complete his task, plenty of time to be out before the neighbors should notice anything amiss.

Siwaldh had seen the monolith from many angles since his arrival and had been able to plot the weakest point.  Research back at the guild of Enchanters, had taught him that this was one of the earliest monoliths and had never received the protection against what he was about to do.  For almost a moment his morals sparked, contemplating the ethics of his action before his mind was awash with details of the preparations.

He knocked everything to the floor from a sturdy desk and started etching into its surface some channels.  Next he poured liquids from various vials he had brought with him. While they sat he dragged over a brazier and started a fire.  It was no Invoker’s Lantern, but it would do the job.

On the second day, Siwaldh was seen leaving the front gate of the Fenshorn Manor by a passing guard.  He stopped him to ask what business he had at the estate.  Before Siwaldh could answer there was a loud cracking noise as stone buckled and sheered. The ground under the city itself shook followed by screams of panic.  Siwaldh waited for the guard to choose his next action, slowly back stepping away.  He then turned and ran, leaving the guard still dazed by what was transpiring.

Forest Walker

Forest Walker, it was never how he would refer to himself.  It was a matter of convenience for him that this is what the people of Saj-graf called him as he is uncertain as to what name he would call himself while in town. His master had always referred to him as Kit.  He always took that as a way of putting him in his place.  For a while he had gone by Eld, and then Erikahn but those days seem distant and the reasons for those names were gone.

Kit reluctantly walked the streets of Saj-graf looking for someone he did not know.  Twenty days earlier his master had a dream of a noble ghost called out for help.  The ghost was guarded by two knights, one made of wood and another unable to speak, and brought together by a third whose face was obscured.  The ghost was in need of help that the three others could not provide. Kit was puzzled by his master requiting him to investigate.  A Forest Walker had little use in the confusion of the city, best he could do was clean a well that had gone awry with taint or disease.

Out in the woods on a calm day, he could mend wounds and ailments as if it were a tailor fixing a shirt.  He needed the calm of the forest or plains, to hear the wind or water direct the flow of life’s energy.  In the city it was all disjointed, a cacophony of noise and a lack of order in the background hindered his focus.  There Kit could not tell if the life force he felt was from a passing horse or any one of the passing people hurrying by.

Kit looked around and realized he had wandered a bit further from the denser portions of the city, closer to the outer walls.  There sat an old house with many unfortunate souls sitting outside.  He heard a hum from inside something; it reminded him of the spirits outside the city, unbound to a body.  It was a pleasant hum; he could see the pull it had on those around the house.  It was as if it was nourishing or healing those around, but lacked a complete understanding of how they worked.  He gave pause to investigate, and then a small bird chirped. The hum now grated on Kit’s nerves.  He sensed a second energy beyond his ken.  Something that was feeding inside the house, but on what he couldn’t tell.  Kit made a quick retreat back to the better populated portions of the city, scared as to what that may have been and thankful to the bird’s passing.

Catching his breath and orientating himself a passing warrior caught his eye, her equipment was adorned with two trees.  Perhaps this was one of the ghost’s guards.

Interrogation

Siwaldh looked around the room.  He saw no windows, no decoration, just himself sitting at small wood table and the two women across from him. One a younger woman, with short brown hair dressed in a loose fitting shirt and pants.  Her hands and feet were hidden in worn leather and a small dagger hanging from her hips.  The second woman looked slightly older than the other.  To Siwaldh they looked related by the green tone of the eye and certain curves in the face.  The older one was lither, with longer darker hair.  The younger one he thought looked familiar, as his eyes focused he realized her as the one called Maeve.  He had failed in his contract on her so far and had a glimmer of hope this may say why.

Siwaldh couldn’t quite recall how he ended up here.  He had been walking back from a conference with Eartle in the afternoon and then was here.  He had several enchantments that they should have not been able to bypass, unless one of them was an enchanter themselves.  Yet neither looked the part nor matched descriptions of those in the higher circles.

“Maeve,” the older one said, “I believe your job pays more so, you can go first.  I do so like when we can work together.”

“Very well Cerridwen,” Maeve responded. “Siwaldh, You are a hard man to locate and track so we are holding you here till we have our information.   It has come to my employer’s attention that you are causing problems for several merchants in town.  I am, at my discretion, to find out whom you work for and what your goals are.  If you provide what I need I will release you to Cerridwen who will settle her business with you.”

“You ask for cooperation when I have no guarantee of safety from your sister.  What if she is paid to kill me, where is my motivation?”

“I will not kill you,” Cerridwen commented not masking her disinterest.

“There you have it.  So answer now or we have to step up motivation to talk.”

“Those who employ me cannot be less powerful than the ones who have hired you.  Once they find out that you have taken me captive…”

Maeve cut in, “Yes, yes I get it.”  She walked over and placed the blade of her dagger on his left thumb and nicked it.

“Point taken,” Siwaldh replied. “However I am bound by oath and enchantment to not talk and cannot talk.”

Cerridwen stood up and walked over to behind him.  She reached in amongst his hair, grabbing a tuft close to the neck and yanked.  As he creamed out, she commented, “There, I think the bond is broken.”  She dropped the pile of hairs to the floor.

“Woman, do you know the first thing about enchantments?”

“I know you should answer questions, when a young lady asks nicely.”

“I said before I cannot say that the Prince and Earlte…”

“I think you fixed his problem,” Maeve smiled.  “Go on, you were saying?”

Siwaldh was flummoxed as she had broken the enchantment.  His protection was gone and he said more than he had ever planned too.  He paused weighing his situation, then responded. “They have odd jobs for me to do.  I don’t ask for their motives as that lowers my pay.  I am here for two weeks of service than gone.  Cerridwen are you an Enchanter?”

“That is all I needed,” Maeve answered.

“I need only one thing from you Siwaldh.” Cerridwen stated. “Where do you keep your enchantments?”

Before he could stop himself, he answered, “Various places, a few on me and others hidden in the room, each a puzzle to open and each with a different puzzle to use.”

All went black for Siwaldh after he spoke.  When his vision came back in focus he stood in the middle of the street on his way back from Eartle.  He tried to recall who he talked to and it faded like a dream on waking.  As he tried to grab details they pulled back faster.